Picture this. You start up your autonomous car and the holographic display on the dashboard comes to life. Directions to your destination are overlaid onto your view of the road. After driving for a short period of time you swipe your hand to turn directions off and enable autonomous driving mode. You lay back and relax as you put a movie into the DVD player. A short time later you run low on gas. A holographic notification pops up above your dashboard and right next to it an ad pops up for nearby gas stations, showing you their distance from you as well as ranking them by price. You swipe one of the stations and your car automatically takes you there.

A few hours later it is approaching dinner time and another ad pops up on your dashboard showcasing a nearby, locals’ favorite. It’s not a big leap to imagine that the near future could look very similar.

Data has become increasingly more relevant in our daily lives as advertisers have moved to target us by our interests, likes, location, and more. Soon, these same types of processes will be able to single out ads for us on our TVs. Why not our vehicle as well? The same way I’ve grown to appreciate these types of ads on Facebook and other networks I can see a true purpose for these in a vehicle as well.

Ads are here to stay; therefore, the least we can ask for is that they be relevant to us and data can allow just that. Our cars could parse through our ‘likes’ and see that we’re fans of Taco Bell, suggesting the nearest Taco Bell restaurants. When our tire goes flat our car could automatically suggest a close-by location to repair it. Vehicle AI could suggest to us locations based on the time of day. When you get in your car in the morning, it might suggest that you are heading to work and drive you there autonomously with one swipe. Or it might use location data to see that you stop by the babysitters on your way home from work every day, taking you to that location before bringing you home. Sensors in the seats could warn overwrought parents that their child is still in the back seat. These possibilities could soon be realities.

Although along with possibilities and growth, comes fear and trepidation as privacy becomes a huge concern. How much of your privacy or data are you willing to give up in order to incorporate these autonomous suggestions into your daily lifestyle? Can you see a point where the trade off of your data becomes an advantage for your lifestyle or does your privacy mean more than your convenience?

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